All posts by Clara Nellist

Particle physicist and science communicator.

First 13 TeV Collisions with stable beams at CERN

Last Wednesday, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN started colliding protons with stable beams at the highest energy we’ve ever achieved! I had a very early start (alarm went off at 5.30am) to be in the ATLAS Control Room and tell everyone all about it on social media through the ATLAS Twitter accounts. There was a team of us from ATLAS Outreach working that day.

Even at 8am, it was standing room only as so many people wanted to see the first stable beam collisions at 13 TeV.

CERN had a live webcast to explain what was happening and at one point, when checking it, I realised I was live in the background of an interview with ATLAS Spokesperson, Dave Charlton. So, I acted natural and was thankful that, even though I was supposed to be doing the social media, I wasn’t on Facebook.

Me on the CERN webcast.
Me on the CERN webcast.

A little before 9am, the beams that had been increasing in energy inside the LHC were dumped and they had to start again. No problem, as it’s essentially a new machine, this was not unexpected. Everyone went to get coffee and breakfast (or second breakfasts) and I updated Twitter:

Continue reading First 13 TeV Collisions with stable beams at CERN

Parlez-vous français ?

I first started trying to learn French when I planned to moved to Geneva to work at CERN for my PhD. I took a few lessons and downloaded a podcast, but when I actually arrived, and was surrounded by Brits, or English speaking colleagues, I quickly found that other tasks took higher priority and I didn’t get any further than ordering food at a restaurant.

La tour D'Eiffel However, when I accepted a post-doc in Paris, I knew things would be different. Officially the work was in English since I would still be working with the same international researchers at CERN that I was before. But this time I was moving out on my own, so I wasn’t going to have a large British group of friends, and I had been warned that many of the engineers and support staff that I would be working with either didn’t speak English, or strongly preferred speaking French. Not to mention all of the daily life tasks I would have to face, such as finding an apartment. This was OK. In fact, it was one of the reasons looked outside of the UK for my first post-doc; I was tired of being the only monolingual in a crowd of bi-, tri- and even poly-linguals! I had to learn at least one language and moving somewhere I was going to be forced to speak it was the only way it was going to happen.

Continue reading Parlez-vous français ?

How do you spend your rest and relaxation time?

In physics, as in running, how you manage your rest time is just as important as how you spend your time working (or training).

I am currently preparing for a long-distance race in April, so even though I have a to-do list that extends onto multiple pages, this gives me the motivation to take time away from my computer and get outside. Yesterday I went for a run along the La Seine, up to the famous Notre Dame cathedral and down to Luxembourg gardens. It was a beautiful sunny day, but the temperature was around freezing. Below are a few photographs I stopped to take along the way.

How do you spend your time off? Let me know in the comments below!

Séminaire Poincaré

Last Saturday was the Séminaire Poincaré at l’Institut Henri Poincaré in Paris. There was a whole day of talks on ‘Le Boson H’ which translates to ‘the H[iggs] boson’, although for reasons that may soon become apparent, it was only referred to as the H boson in the talks. Unfortunately because of a flight that evening, I could only make the morning session, but the timing wasn’t too bad as the first talk was the one that I really wanted to see. That morning was one where I truly appreciated living in Paris. I woke up at a reasonable time for a Saturday morning and took a short bus to the institute, which is close to the Pantheon and just south of the Notre Dame cathedral.

Seminaire Poincare poster
Seminaire Poincare poster

The lecture theatre was smaller than I expected, but completely packed when I arrived and it was difficult to find a seat. Not surprising since the first talk was given by Professor François Englert, the Belgian theoretical physicist who shared the Nobel prize for physics in 2013 for: “… the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider”.

Prof. Englert answering questions after his Seminairé Poincaré talk.
Prof. Englert answering questions after his Seminairé Poincaré talk.

The talk was in French, but with the use of the slides and a knowledge of the subject I was able to follow along happily. When the seminar stopped for lunch, I went down to the front to talk to Prof. Englert. I asked if he would sign my copy of the seminar papers, which he was more than happy to do.

Signed copy of the Séminaire Poincaré papers by Prof. Englert.
Signed copy of the Séminaire Poincaré papers by Prof. Englert.

I explained to Prof. Englert that I was a particle physicist working on the ATLAS experiment at CERN. He asked if we’d met before and I told him that although we’d not met directly, we had been present in the same room, when the announcement of the new boson discovered at CERN was made in 2012. He apologised to me for not recognising me, to which I replied that it was a busy and exciting day, plus I was all the way at the back of an extremely packed auditorium, while he had been reserved a space at the front. It was a very nice chat and an honour to meet him. Afterwards I asked if we could have a photograph together.

Photo with Prof. Englert
Photo with Prof. Englert.

Edit: If you look closely at the photo you might be able to see that Prof. Englert was wearing a particle physics tie and, the ultimate physics fashion accessory, a Nobel prize gold pin.

CERN Dishwasher

While I was curating the @RealScientists account and generally being a tourist at work around CERN, I snapped a photo of dishwasher that was being used to clean a readout board I needed for my test beam experiment. I put the photo up on Twitter and it got a little bit of attention. The photo was spotted by CERN, and yesterday Rosaria Marraffino wrote a CERN bulletin article about the dishwasher. It seems to be a very popular image as only a day later it’s already amassed over a thousand retweets on Twitter! Here’s the tweet (below) and a link to the article.

Academic nomad

Here is a collection of some of my favourite photos taken on my academic nomadic journeys. Most of them were shot with a phone and they may have been Instagram’ed for the filters. You can expect a mixture of scenic and scientific.

(Note this album will be updated as I take new photos – come back later to see what’s new!)

View this post on Instagram

My office this morning. #academicnomad

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

Vineyard.

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

This week I'm in Lund for the LHCP conference.

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

Piazza Castillo, Turin, Italy. #academicnomad

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

At the test beam at @CERN.

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

Bright rainbow at @cern.

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

Beautiful books in the work library. #BeautifulBooks

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

View this post on Instagram

Horseshoe at sunrise.

A post shared by Clara Nellist (@claranellist) on

Real Scientists

Last week I was the curator of the Real Scientists Twitter account (@RealScientists). It coincided with a trip to CERN for a test beam experiment so I took full advantage of being on site to show as much of CERN as possible. I ended up having a lot of fun being a tourist in my own lab and got to see parts of the site I’d never been to before! It started off a little slow as I found my feet with a new (to me) account and as I prepared for my trip, but everything really took off Tuesday morning when I landed in Geneva.

I wanted to include as many photos as I could, to allow people to feel like they were really visiting the lab. The following was a very popular image (but please excuse the typo, the WWW was invented just *over* 25 years ago).

I also talked about my preparations for the experiment at CERN, including a bit of shoe-shopping!

Continue reading Real Scientists